Artist Way 2019-2020

artistwThis year’s E-circle Artist Way group starts next Monday and the anticipation is growing. I’ve just returned from a month in Italy and Greece and my brain is stuttering in low gear. I’m eager to put pen to page, clean out the sludge and awaken the starry-eyed dreamer within. We’re reading Julia Cameron’s “Finding Water” from the Artist Way series along with Elizabeth Gilbert’s “Big Magic.” Each year I chose a project to write 3 pages on daily, along with the Morning Pages, in a genre outside my wheelhouse. Initially I experience an impending sense of doom over dipping my toes into unknown waters. However, I know from past years that, a few weeks in, the hard brown bud of initial idea will soften and split. Crinkled curls of color will slowly unfurl into full blooming vibrant life. This leaping off of a creative cliff is one I find equally thrilling and terrifying. Wish me luck!

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Interview with David Alan Binder

I really enjoyed doing an interview with David Alan Binder this week talking about the writing process and creativity.  He’s a great supporter of writing for writing’s sake, and you’ll find all kinds of great information on his site:

Writers and Writing

I’ve just finished reading “The Hero is You” by Kendra Levin.  She challenges a writer to use the archetypes in Joseph Campbell’s heroic journey not only in plot and character, but also in their life, all the while guiding them through inspiration to completed MS. I was challenged by the questions it forced me to ask.

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We’re half-way through the Artist Way E-Circle group with Julia’s Cameron’s new book. It’s wonderful to join with old friends and new, with keen expectations and trembling fear, to re-kindle the creative fire. We may be unique in our artistic histories, hopes and angst, but we’re comfortingly the same beneath the surface.  I am always amazed that it continues to be a journey of discovery for me.

Is a wet blanket haunting your writing?

All the writers who’ve attended my retreat Answering The Call, know I’m an avid fan of Julia Cameron’s Artist Way books. Her writing never fails to ground me when I become overly anxious about the creative process.  I used to lug a ton of her books there in a duffle bag and hole up with a fistful of pens, hot green tea, Paula Red apples and reams of foolscap.  Let the Shadows Fall Behind You was birthed in a tiny unadorned room containing a single bed at the end of a silent hall on the second floor. A statue of the Virgin Mary stood outside the door, which I found comforting when one of the nuns who runs the Villa told us it was haunted. I spent hours propped against pillows gazing out the window that overlooked an ancient evergreen, whose dark branches slowly rose to the foreground, gaining inky definition each night as the sun slipped behind the hills.

 

Last week I met with my friend Sara to talk about getting together after Christmas to discuss Walking in the World one of Julia’s new books, as we each start a new project. The novel I’m writing now is set in the 1930’s and, of course, the critic inside my head keeps harping that I shouldn’t be writing about an era of history I didn’t actually live in, and that I’ll probably get it all wrong.  Coffee with Sara was just the spark I needed to accept that voice and get back to the drawing board anyway.

 

Do you have a wet blanket haunting your writing? If so, you might enjoy this snippet on YouTube of Julia Cameron speaking at Wisdom House February of last year.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__0XbfkOXVc

 

 

 

Good-bye wet blanket.

Best

Kathy-Diane